Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones Review

Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones Review

Pros: Neutral balance, detailed, good texture in general, good tight, punchy bass, well extended treble for a closed set, excellent imaging, commendably transparent

Cons: Uneasy without small adjustment, underwhelming bass extension, can appear rather intense, only typical soundstage, seclusion not excellent

Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones Review

Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones Review

Introduction

Like my DT880, and for nearly as long, the SRH440 has actually been a dependable buddy, in its case pulling double responsibility as my portable earphone and as my “plug-it-in-real-quick” set. It’s just reasonable it gets an appropriate review. Back in 2009, Shure launched a brand-new line of closed-back, full-sized earphones, which consisted of the SRH440, srh240, and srh840. Basically, Shure had actually handled to attain the difficult, which was to make a closed back earphone that in fact sounded excellent and whose name didn’t include the number 5.

It’s amusing how people forgot about that when all the glossy brand-new earphones began coming out, however, the SRH440 specifically appears to be completely deserted. Most likely not, as it’s not even much better than my simple DT880, however it’s a damn great set of earphones for less than $100 these days.

Total Summary

Normally, here’s the reduced variation: the SRH440 is a neutral earphone, leaning a little towards brightness, with an average-sized soundstage, great imaging, punchy however not awfully extended bass, well balanced and well-textured mids, and a little leading treble with excellent extension for a closed design. It’s not especially comfy stock, regrettably, however can be somewhat customized (see the pertinent area) to enhance convenience significantly. Do not change its pads with the SRH840 ones as is typically recommended, at least up until after you have actually read my unique area about that.

The box does not come with an entire lot in it apart from the earphones, however that’s not a huge offer. You get the SRH440 itself, a 1/4″ adapter, a fast guide/specifications book, a black pleather bring pouch, and an orange service warranty card. One location where the SRH440 does not impress me so much is in the develop quality. The structure likewise feels a bit hollow, and in some locations firm pressure can in fact bend some of the plastic pieces. On the other hand, it does not have the entirely asinine hinge system of the old Sony V700 (which was copied, obviously down to the breakable plastics, in the SRH940), so the whole structure is sounder than this description may make it appear.

Convenience is at first subpar, on account of a strange design option (or maybe, more cynically, an example of constructed in up selling; the pads are rather shallow, and the product connected to the back of them that’s suggested to secure the chauffeur from dirt and earwax is so thin it might as well not be there. The headband on the SRH440 (and from exactly what I have actually checked out, the SRH840 as well) digs annoyingly into lots of individuals’ heads. I have actually resolved both these issues, the very first by putting a felt circle on top of each motorist guard (I punched out holes for the bass reflex ports), and the 2nd by utilizing a piece from a velcro roll to stick some foam under the headband. With these adjustments convenience is in fact rather excellent.

Ergonomically I’ll point out that, like numerous Sony screen earphones I understand of, there’s just one appropriate method to use the SRH440. In other words, you cannot switch channels by turning the earphone around.

Noise

Tonal Balance

The total balance is neutral favoring a little brilliant. Their treble peaks aren’t as high as those of the DT880, however the general treble level is really a little raised over that of the DT880, think it or not. While total they do not come across as rather as intense as the DT880, part of their EQ calibration curve (see the appropriate area) includes shelving down everything above 10kHz by 3 dB.

– BASS-.

Extension is rather doing not have, however the mid-bass is happily punchy and is extremely somewhat bumped up. The general character of the bass is tight, punchy, and remarkably textured. There’s a specific heft and grunt to the SRH440 bass that I discover extremely satisfying.

– MIDRANGE-.

Guitars and vocals have a good, crisp discussion, and the tone is extremely natural. Primarily it’s simply an energetic, poised discussion that reminds me a lot of a good set of mini-monitors.

– TREBLE & EQ-.

Absolutely tipped up a little in total volume, the treble is nevertheless remarkably complimentary of grain for being so popular. Even without EQ the treble is appropriate, however it has a tendency to be edgy.

Discussion – Macro.

Soundstage is one location where the SRH440 is an obvious action down from the DT880 (given that their tonal balances are rather comparable). The impact of changing in between my DT880 and SRH440 is comparable to taking off your existing prescription glasses and putting on the ones you utilized to use one prescription back– everything is still mainly there in the very same percentages, however there’s the sense that something’s discreetly incorrect, which goes away as soon as you have actually invested a little while changing.

Imaging is also really somewhat doing something which not have compared with the DT880, maybe simply since the SRH440 has less raw area where to disperse sonic components. Directional hints are still apparent, however layering is visibly less advanced and there’s this unwavering sensation that the edges of aspects are a little blurred, compared with the razor sharp delineations the DT880 produces. In general it’s not an offer breaking action back, however it’s apparent in direct contrast.

Direct contrast exposes a minor absence of improvement on the part of the SRH440 when compared with the DT880, however it’s not visible in seclusion. The SRH440 is still remarkably transparent for a sub-$ 100 closed earphone.

Discussion – Micro.

Information and texture are well selected in the SRH440. I’d state the SRH440 gets the upper hand on the DT880 here in one regard– it handles to texture its whole variety, whereas the DT880 loses some texture as you come down through its bass extension. Bass in specific is extremely satisfying on the SRH440 as an outcome of this.

A note about the SRH840 pads.

I’m also confused by the many insurance claims that they in some way tame the treble, considering that for me they do the precise reverse. They appear to include a 5dB rack above 5 kHz or so, a bump someplace in between 2.5 kHz and 3 kHz which makes guitars and vocals barky and shrill, and a mid-to-upper bass bump that muddies up the bass and makes it sound like someone simply turned on the MegaXXXXXXtraBass function on an inexpensive mini-system. The SRH440 was voiced with its own pads in mind, and not practical and unpleasant as they may be, you ought to leave them on there.

Conclusion.

In general, the SRH440 is a frequently overlooked/overshadowed earphone. They both do a lot of things right, and they pursue somewhat various tonal balances (the M50 being more focused on mid- and sub bass and less focused on midrange than the SRH440). If you have actually ever felt the exact same method, however otherwise liked the information, openness, and fundamental discussion of the M50, the SRH440 may be best for you. THE GREAT Audio is extremely well balanced and tidy; perfect for house studio recording, however likewise excellent for basic listening; removable, exchangeable cable television; budget friendly cost.

THE BAD General retro and plastic design; cumbersome cable television weighs down the headset; unpleasant for long-lasting usage; exposed little wires ranging from the headband to the earbud. THE BOTTOM LINE: The Shure SRH440 earphones may not appeal to individuals who utilize higher-end devices or who desire skull-shattering bass, however as an action into the world of house studio recording, they sound excellent with a large variety of musical categories.

Back in 2009, Shure launched a brand-new line of closed-back, full-sized earphones, which came with the SRH440, srh240, and srh840. As normal, here’s the reduced variation: the SRH440 is a neutral earphone, leaning a little towards brightness, with an average-sized soundstage, excellent imaging, punchy however not extremely extended bass, well balanced and well-textured mids, and somewhat leading treble with great extension for a closed design. Ergonomically I’ll point out that, like a number of Sony display earphones I understand of, there’s just one appropriate method to use the SRH440. The SRH440 is still remarkably transparent for a sub-$ 100 closed earphone. In general, the SRH440 is a typically overlooked/overshadowed earphone.

Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones Review

Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones Review

Posted on August 30, 2016 in Shure

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